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Trivia Quiz

Test your heating knowledge

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Q1: Where was the first wood stove built in Canada?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A1: The first wood stoves were produced in Saint-Maurice, Quebec in 1742.

1. Image showing early stoves from St Maurice foundry

Q2: How did wood or coal stoves heat hot water?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A2: Heat radiating from the stove kept the water hot in a tank or reservoir attached to the side.

2. Detail of stove showing water reservoir

Q3: When was oil first discovered in Canada?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A3: The first oil find in North America was made in Petrolia, Ontario in 1858.

3. Image of a drilling rig

Q4: How was hot water circulated in early boiler systems?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A4: Gravity systems worked because hot water rises and cold water sinks.

4. Image of a gravity hot water system

Q5: What did every room need for hydronic heating?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A5: Every room had a cast iron radiator to circulate the hot water.

5. Image of a circular radiator

Q6: How did children help with heating pioneer homes?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A6: Children’s pioneer chores could include any task involved in keeping the fire going

6. Image showing children collecting firewood

Q7: How did automated heating lead to indoor recreation?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A7: Indoor recreation needed stable temperatures.

7. Detail from a Maple Leaf Gardens handout from the 1930s

Q8: Who still had heat during the Great Ice Storm of 1998?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A8: Some of the above and others, if they were lucky enough to have wood or gas fireplaces or stoves that did not need electricity to operate.

8. Photo showing ice storm damage in Elora, Ontario, in the early 1900s

Q9: Which of the following was a status symbol for homes in early Canadian pioneer life?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A9: Wood or coal stoves and ranges gave early pioneers the means to heat homes and cook beside a wood fireplace.

9. Image of the front of a small cook stove

Q10: Why was it easier to heat with coal than wood?

  • a)
  • b)
  • c)
  • d)

A10: With coal there was no need to cut trees and chop wood, just bring it inside.

10. Photo shows boys picking lumps of coal off railway tracks in 1914



Standings: Correct/Answered - 0/0

Article Sources

Heating documentary trivia quiz

  • Research from the archives of the HVACR Heritage Centre Canada (DCSB #212).

SIDEBAR

  • Research from the archives of the HVACR Heritage Centre Canada.

Image Credits

Heating documentary trivia quiz

  • Jean Audet, Parks Canada.
  • The D. Moore Company, Limited, Illustrated Catalogue and Price List No. 61, Treasure STOVES and Ranges, 1909–10 (Hamilton, Ontario, n.p., 1909), 24 [detail].
  • Glenbow Archives, ND-1-144.
  • No source provided, via http://www.oldhouseweb.com/how-to-advice/gravity-hot-water-heating.shtml.
  • "Steam circular radiators." in James Morrison Illustrated Catalogue, 1888, Toronto, Ontario, c/o Hugh Palser Collection, London, Ontario.
  • Printed in John C. Charyk, “The pot-bellied stove,” The Little White Schoolhouse (Saskatoon, SK: Modern Press, 1968), 109 (detail).
  • Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0.
  • John R. Connon, Archives of Ontario, I0011567.
  • Nigel Heseltine, HHCC Collection.
  • John Boyd, Archives of Ontario, I0003835.